Marietta Schools may hit snooze button on the alarm clock

Few things cause more emotion than the school bell. The end-of-school alarm is capable of inducing…

Georgia (Mar 28, 2016)Few things cause more emotion than the school bell. The end-of-school alarm is capable of inducing waves of euphoria in students, but that first bell can arouse all kinds of drama. That’s because, as children are prone to do, they refuse to wake up, rush through their breakfast (if there’s time to eat at all) and hurry off to school to beat the clock.

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Marietta City Schools is considering making things a bit easier for the late riser by delaying the first bell of the day. On Wednesday, about two dozen parents attended a meeting to learn more about the proposal….

Dr. Charles Amlaner, vice president for research at Kennesaw State University, has been studying the science of sleep for more than 40 years. Amlaner says the prevailing belief is that young people are waking up too early and not getting to bed early enough, prompting sleep deprivation.

The range of sleep children and teenagers should be receiving is between 10 and 12 hours a night, the professor advises, with elementary school-level children needing 11 to 12 hours, middle school students an hour less and high school students in the 10-hour range.

Amlaner illustrates the sleep needs of the young by explaining how a pregnant mother recognizes her baby is sleeping about 22 to 23 hours per day in the womb. Once born and until the age of 1 or 2, that sleep scales back to around 14 to 16 hours, he said.

Children need more sleep for brain and muscle development. When they don’t receive enough, they have trouble with memory and concentration. For instance, children who stay up late cramming for a test often do not perform as well as they would have after a good night’s sleep.

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A leader in innovative teaching and learning, Kennesaw State University offers more than 150 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degrees to its approximately 41,000 students. With 11 colleges on two metro Atlanta campuses, Kennesaw State is a member of the University System of Georgia and the third-largest university in the state. The university’s vibrant campus culture, diverse population, strong global ties and entrepreneurial spirit draw students from throughout the region and from 92 countries across the globe. Kennesaw State is a Carnegie-designated doctoral research institution (R2), placing it among an elite group of only 6 percent of U.S. colleges and universities with an R1 or R2 status, and one of the 50 largest public institutions in the country. For more information, visit kennesaw.edu

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