Bergdahl adds heft to campaign silly season

Doug Richards, WXIA8:11 p.m. EDT June 5, 2014 ATLANTA-- The emptiness of political discourse is…

Georgia (Jun 9, 2014)Doug Richards, WXIA8:11 p.m. EDT June 5, 2014

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http://www.11alive.com/story/news/local/2014/06/05/senate-georgia/10033403/

ATLANTA-- The emptiness of political discourse is measurable by the commercials. Exhibit A this year would be the series of commercials for U.S. Senate candidates that featured babies depicting politicians. It is theater that can starkly contrast with the importance of the office sought.

"it's just a very different type of activity, governing and politicking," said Kerwin Swint, Kennesaw State University political science professor.

It's demonstrated with the issue of Bowe Bergdahl, the U.S. Army sergeant freed by the Taliban -- and the controversy that has stirred. Central to it has been Saxby Chambliss, the retiring U.S. Senator from Georgia whose seat is sought by the men behind the baby commercials.

As Intelligence Committee chairman, Sen. Chambliss arguably follows the lineage of other national figures who occupied Senate seats from Georgia -- including Senators Sam Nunn, Carl Vinson and Richard Russell.

"Saxby Chambliss currently has a heightened role on the intelligence committee. And he's able to play a role in substantive foreign policy issues that Kingston or Perdue (or Michelle Nunn) would have to perform once they're in office," Swint said. …


 

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