Former U.S. Surgeon General addresses healthcare disparities in America

Former U.S. Surgeon General David Satcher was the featured speaker Feb. 19 in the “Lessons from Leaders: Why Leadership and Ethics Matter Speaker Series‚” sponsored by the Siegel Institute for Leadership‚ Ethics & Character at KSU. The series focuses on lessons learned from leaders across a spectrum of disciplines.(For the complete story‚ please click on the headline above.)

Georgia (Feb 22, 2008) — At $2 trillion a year‚ the U.S. spends more money on health care than any other nation in the world.

Nearly all of that money‚ according to former U.S. Surgeon General David Satcher‚ is spent treating preventable diseases.

“We need to make prevention a priority‚” said Satcher‚ who also served concurrently as the assistant secretary for health under both the Clinton and Bush administrations‚ from 1998−2002. “The U.S. spends 16 percent of its gross national product for health care. There is no excuse for not having universal health care.”

Satcher envisions any universal health care program in the U.S. would probably be a public−private partnership‚ which would help reduce the nearly $400 million in administrative costs for health care.

“In countries where there is universal health care‚ they pay less of their gross national product and have better outcomes‚” he said. “Money is driving the system in the U.S.‚ and it’s driving it into the ground.”

Satcher was the featured speaker Feb. 19 in the “Lessons from Leaders: Why Leadership and Ethics Matter Speaker Series‚” sponsored by the Siegel Institute for Leadership‚ Ethics & Character at KSU. The series focuses on lessons learned from leaders across a spectrum of disciplines.

“His message was that we should be leaders and advocates of health and wellness‚” said nursing senior Gerri Baxter‚ her 4−year−old son Omari Tunstall in tow.

Satcher‚ 66‚ made history for holding the surgeon general and assistant secretary for health positions simultaneously. He was also the first male African−American surgeon general since the high−ranking post was created after the Civil War.

Today‚ he serves as director of the Center of Excellence on Health Disparities and The Satcher Health Leadership Institute Initiative‚ based at the Morehouse School of Medicine. There‚ he also holds the Poussaint−Satcher−Cosby Chair in Mental Health.

Upcoming speakers in the Siegel Institute series include:
• Atlanta Women’s Foundation President Deborah Richardson;
• Kent “Oz” Nelson‚ former CEO of UPS; and
• Billy Hayes‚ CEO of Northside Hospital−Cherokee.

MORE NEWS…




 

A leader in innovative teaching and learning, Kennesaw State University offers more than 150 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degrees to its approximately 41,000 students. With 11 colleges on two metro Atlanta campuses, Kennesaw State is a member of the University System of Georgia and the third-largest university in the state. The university’s vibrant campus culture, diverse population, strong global ties and entrepreneurial spirit draw students from throughout the region and from 92 countries across the globe. Kennesaw State is a Carnegie-designated doctoral research institution (R2), placing it among an elite group of only 6 percent of U.S. colleges and universities with an R1 or R2 status, and one of the 50 largest public institutions in the country. For more information, visit kennesaw.edu

©