Cobb County NAACP donates historical legacy to Kennesaw State archives

A photograph of Hugh Grogan‚ the first African American elected to public office in Cobb County‚ is among a treasure trove of archival documents donated Feb. 21 to Kennesaw State University by the Cobb County chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.(For the complete story‚ please click on the headline above.)

Georgia (Feb 22, 2008) — A photograph of Hugh Grogan‚ the first African American elected to public office in Cobb County‚ is among a treasure trove of archival documents donated Feb. 21 to Kennesaw State University by the Cobb County chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

While Grogan was president of the Cobb County chapter of the NAACP‚ the organization filed a redistricting lawsuit against the city of Marietta. The lawsuit‚ settled out of court in 1975‚ led to Grogan’s election to the city council two years later.

Throughout the turbulent school desegregation period of the 1960s and 1970s‚ the Cobb County NAACP was on the front lines for equality. The organization was a strong voice for civil‚ educational and political rights‚ and much of that history is reflected in the historical records donated to KSU.

“It’s a significant collection‚” said Tamara Livingston‚ director of archives and records management at Kennesaw State. “It will be an absolute gold mine for KSU and the community as a source of information on the African−American experience in Cobb County.”

Livingston and NAACP Cobb County Branch President Deane Bonner on Thursday signed the official deed giving KSU the collection‚ which also includes:

• A 1975 photograph documenting an historic meeting between NAACP members and officials at Dobbins Air Force Base‚ which addressed hiring issues and race relations;
• 1970s−era issues of “Cobb Community News‚” the only African−American newspaper in the county; and
• A signed letter from former Sen. Sam Nunn‚ dated Oct. 11‚ 1990‚ congratulating the chapter on their annual Freedom Fund awards banquet.

“We are elated to be passing our archives onto Kennesaw State University‚” Bonner said.

The NAACP will begin transferring the documents to the university within a week‚ and the collection will be available to researchers‚ as well as the public‚ in about two months.

“The NAACP of Cobb County and Kennesaw State share many ideals‚ such as educating everyone‚” President Dan Papp told those gathered for the signing ceremony. “That’s what the NAACP is about‚ and what Kennesaw State is about.

“We also share the values of equality for all human beings‚ the dignity of all human beings and the right to equal opportunity for all human beings.”

Cobb County historian and history professor Tom Scott is credited with the partnership between university and the NAACP. Scott is the author of “Cobb County‚ Georgia‚ and the Origins of the Suburban South: A Twentieth−Century History.”


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