Art professor retiring after 23 years

Running two art galleries and teaching‚ in addition to curating more than 100 major exhibitions‚ is no small feat for one person. But these are just a handful of Roberta Griffin’s accomplishments during her 23 years at KSU.

Georgia (Jun 26, 2006) — Running two art galleries and teaching‚ in addition to curating more than 100 major exhibitions‚ is no small feat for one person. But these are just a handful of Roberta Griffin’s accomplishments during her 23 years at KSU.

Since her arrival at Kennesaw‚ Griffin has worked to develop and increase the growth of an undergraduate visual arts program‚ as well as raise more than two million dollars in contemporary art donations to the university’s permanent collections.

“What I enjoy most about the art program here at KSU is its ability to grow‚ the exciting students and the university itself for being so supportive of having a strong gallery and art program‚” Griffin said. “Throughout my career here‚ it was really nice to see growth occur and be a part of it.”

After earning both a master’s degree in art education and a diplomate in collegiate teaching from the University of Miami‚ Griffin began her higher education teaching career at Miami−Dade Community College before coming to KSU in 1983.

Griffin arrived during a time of transition‚ when the institution was moving from a growing junior college of about 4‚500 students to a prominent four−year undergraduate school.

“The emerging college needed enthusiastic and energetic personnel to make this daunting transition‚” said Patrick Taylor‚ chair of the department of visual arts from 1987 to 1999. “She came to the art program with the experience‚ talent‚ energy and vision to develop a major in art.”

Throughout her career‚ Griffin worked with students‚ as well as faculty‚ to ensure a stable and growing art program.

“Roberta Griffin has tremendous energy‚” said Shane McDonald‚ coordinator of the Visual Resource Center. “As one of my first college art teachers‚ she was clearly passionate about art as an important means of societal communication and cultural recreation. She was not afraid to stand up for the validity of the efforts of artists and their supporters.”

Griffin will retire in August to devote more of her time to creating art but will stay involved in the university as a professor emeritus and a board member of Friends for the Visual Arts.

“I have learned as much from my students and faculty colleagues as I hope they may have learned from me‚ not just about teaching but about becoming a complete human being‚” Griffin said.




 

A leader in innovative teaching and learning, Kennesaw State University offers more than 150 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degrees to its more than 41,000 students. With 11 colleges on two metro Atlanta campuses, Kennesaw State is a member of the University System of Georgia and the second-largest university in the state. The university’s vibrant campus culture, diverse population, strong global ties and entrepreneurial spirit draw students from throughout the region and from 126 countries across the globe. Kennesaw State is a Carnegie-designated doctoral research institution (R2), placing it among an elite group of only 6 percent of U.S. colleges and universities with an R1 or R2 status. For more information, visit kennesaw.edu

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