Purchase of Frey Lake Road homes brings additional space equal to that of the Wilson Building to KSU

With help from the KSU Foundation‚ the university recently completed the purchase of nine homes on Frey Lake Road.

Georgia (Sep 18, 2002) — With help from the KSU Foundation‚ the university recently completed the purchase of nine homes on Frey Lake Road.



The houses‚ which will add 50‚000 square feet of roofed space‚ and another 9‚000 square feet of patio‚ deck and porch space to KSU’s inventory of facilities‚ will be used for a variety of purposes‚ including an "International House‚" a student health center and an alumni house‚ according to Vice President for Business and Finance Earle Holley.



"This purchase has been in the works for about a year‚ and we closed on the houses May 17‚" Holley said. "Our main interest in the homes was to provide a needed buffer between our new student housing and the Weatherbyrne Woods neighborhood‚ in addition to our need for more space and land."



The university is leasing the houses from the foundation‚ which is the owner of the properties‚ Holley said. The foundation has already taken possession of one home‚ and there are staggered take−over dates for the remaining eight homes between now and December.



"The use of houses by universities is not an exception‚" Holley said. "Many universities‚ particularly those with in−town campuses‚ use houses."



Other uses for the properties include housing a number of the university’s centers‚ including the Center for Institutional Effectiveness‚ the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning‚ and the Center for Election Systems and Science Collaboratives.



"We’ve got so many needs for space‚ that we had to prioritize our needs‚ and we’re continuing to look at what the best uses of the space are‚" Holley said.



For the uses that have already been determined‚ including the "International House" and the student health center‚ the benefit of those houses to the university community will be almost immediate.



In the past‚ finding housing for visiting international faculty hasn’t been a problem‚ Holley said‚ but transportation becomes an issue with off−campus housing. The benefits of having a student health center across the street from the university’s new living and learning community are obvious.



"The International House will allow us to be more aggressive in the area of recruiting visiting scholars from other countries‚" he said. "That house will also be home to our Center For Hispanic Studies."



While plans call for the university to move in to the houses "as is‚" some minor renovation work will need to be done‚ Holley said‚ including installing the campus communications network into the houses.



"That’s going to be a challenge‚" Holley said of transferring the functionality of the current campus communications systems into the houses‚ "but I think one of our biggest challenges will be to show the neighborhoods that our firm commitment is to be as good a neighbor as the former homeowners."




 

A leader in innovative teaching and learning, Kennesaw State University offers more than 150 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degrees to its approximately 41,000 students. With 11 colleges on two metro Atlanta campuses, Kennesaw State is a member of the University System of Georgia and the third-largest university in the state. The university’s vibrant campus culture, diverse population, strong global ties and entrepreneurial spirit draw students from throughout the region and from 92 countries across the globe. Kennesaw State is a Carnegie-designated doctoral research institution (R2), placing it among an elite group of only 6 percent of U.S. colleges and universities with an R1 or R2 status, and one of the 50 largest public institutions in the country. For more information, visit kennesaw.edu

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