KSU participates in collaborative community service

Despite being one of the richest counties in Georgia‚ there are pockets of poverty in Cobb County. As a member of the Cobb Community Collaborative‚ KSU’s Center for Nonprofit and Public Leadership is involved in helping ensure a quality of life for the neediest among us.

Georgia (Aug 26, 2002) — Despite being one of the richest counties in Georgia‚ there are pockets of poverty in Cobb County. As a member of the Cobb Community Collaborative‚ KSU’s Center for Nonprofit and Public Leadership is involved in helping ensure a quality of life for the neediest among us.



The recent receipt of a $655‚000 federal Department of Labor grant will help the collaborative increase the standard of living among people in the county who most need assistance.



"One of the ways the center hopes to be involved in this initiative and others‚" said Dr. Anne Hicks−Coolick‚ director of the Center for Nonprofit and Public Leadership‚ "is by providing training to the organizations that hope to provide neighborhood services‚ but don’t have the experience. For example‚ if a group wants to set up a parenting class‚ we would help them learn how to develop programming‚ set up a board‚ whatever they need to make their program work." The center is housed in KSU’s College of Health and Human Services.



The Compassionate Communities Workforce Development Initiative is part of President Bush’s Charitable Choice legislation and marks one of the first times federal funds can be used by faith−based‚ social−service providers.



The Cobb Community Collaborative will administer the grant money to grassroots‚ nonprofit and faith−based organizations providing workforce training at the neighborhood and community level in Cobb‚ Cherokee and Douglas counties.



Sixth District Congressman Johnny Isakson‚ R−Ga.‚ presented the grant check at a recent campus ceremony. "The Cobb Community Collaborative is a shining light‚" said Isakson‚ "recognized by President Bush as an example of the importance of meshing nonprofit and faith−based initiatives to provide service."



"The concept of working through a collaborative that could provide broad−based‚ partnership−oriented service made the CCC stand out‚" said Pat Keelean‚ executive director of the CCC‚ as she explained why the CCC was one of only nine organizations chosen for the grant out of 120 applicants nationwide.



Collaboration‚ partnership‚ service – important concepts at Kennesaw State‚ and concepts Hicks−Coolick is proud to support. "We in the center consider ourselves service providers. It is very rewarding to be able to work with the community‚" she said.




 

A leader in innovative teaching and learning, Kennesaw State University offers more than 150 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degrees to its approximately 41,000 students. With 11 colleges on two metro Atlanta campuses, Kennesaw State is a member of the University System of Georgia and the third-largest university in the state. The university’s vibrant campus culture, diverse population, strong global ties and entrepreneurial spirit draw students from throughout the region and from 92 countries across the globe. Kennesaw State is a Carnegie-designated doctoral research institution (R2), placing it among an elite group of only 6 percent of U.S. colleges and universities with an R1 or R2 status, and one of the 50 largest public institutions in the country. For more information, visit kennesaw.edu

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