Kennesaw State teams up with Kaiser Permanente to offer graduate nurses more real-world experience

In an effort to bridge the gap between what graduate nursing students are learning on college…

Georgia (Feb 8, 2001) — Kennesaw State teams up with Kaiser Permanente to offer graduate nurses more real-world experience

Staff

Abstract

In an effort to bridge the gap between what graduate nursing students are learning on college campuses and the realities of today's health care environment‚ Kennesaw State University is joining forces with Kaiser Permanente to create a model for training primary care practitioners to deliver quality care in a managed care setting.

Southeast Permanente Medical Group‚ a division of Kaiser Permanente‚ was recently awarded one of six three−year grants of $150‚000 per year from Partnerships for Quality Education‚ a program funded by The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

The goal of the program is to prepare primary care doctors‚ nurses and physician assistants to work together to achieve better outcomes for their patients at lower costs.

"Partnerships for Quality Education has made significant strides in training doctors to practice high−quality‚ cost−effective‚ community−based medicine in managed care settings‚" Dr. Gordon Moore‚ director of PQE‚ said. "The new grant allows us to expand the number of residency training programs working with managed care organizations and practices‚ as well as to extend the partnership model to nurse practitioner programs.

"Nurse practitioners are a tremendously important component in the primary care delivery system‚ and like physicians‚ must also be prepared to deliver quality care within fixed‚ limited budgets‚" he said.

Located in Kennesaw‚ Ga.‚ Southeast Permanente Medical Group was the only managed care organization to receive funding for developing an academic−managed care partnership.

"This summer‚ we'll start putting students at the Kaiser site‚" Genie Dorman‚ chair of Kennesaw State's primary care nursing department‚ said. "It's an opportunity for our nurse practitioner students to participate in a true‚ interdisciplinary education with physicians and physician assistants."

Dorman said while medical professionals who specialize in different areas of patient care generally operate in "silos‚" Kaiser's pilot program will teach the next generation of doctors‚ physician assistants and registered nurses to work together as a team.

"That way‚ the patient will get the strength of all three disciplines and they'll receive better care‚" she said.

According to Julie Martin‚ MSN‚ CPNP‚ training program leader in Kaiser's department of professional development‚ Kaiser chose to collaborate with Kennesaw State University because "of their standard for excellence in education."



A leader in innovative teaching and learning, Kennesaw State University offers more than 150 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degrees to its approximately 38,000 students. With 13 colleges on two metro Atlanta campuses, Kennesaw State is a member of the University System of Georgia and the third-largest university in the state. The university’s vibrant campus culture, diverse population, strong global ties and entrepreneurial spirit draw students from throughout the region and from 92 countries across the globe. Kennesaw State is a Carnegie-designated doctoral research institution (R2), placing it among an elite group of only 6 percent of U.S. colleges and universities with an R1 or R2 status, and one of the 50 largest public institutions in the country. For more information, visit kennesaw.edu.

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