Kennesaw State presents “Bagels and Grits: A History of Jews in the South”

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Contact: Anna Tucker, atucke20@kennesaw.edu, 770-420-4699 Norman Radow debuts Paul and Beverly…

Georgia (Apr 9, 2013)Contact: Anna Tucker, atucke20@kennesaw.edu, 770-420-4699

Norman Radow debuts Paul and Beverly Radow Lecture Series on Jewish Life, April 24

KENNESAW, Ga.  (April 9, 2013) — Historian Stuart Rockoff  will present “Bagels and Grits: A History of Jews in the South,” kicking off the free, Inaugural Paul and Beverly Radow Lecture Series on Jewish Life, Wednesday, April 24, at 6 p.m. in the Kennesaw State University Social Sciences Building, Room1019.

The Inaugural Paul and Beverly Radow Lecture, “Bagels and Grits: A History of Jews in the South,” is co-sponsored by the Kennesaw State University College of Humanities and Social Sciences and the Department of Museums, Archives & Rare Books. It is open to the public.

Series creator Norman Radow is the immediate past chair of the Kennesaw State University Foundation and president and CEO of RADCO, an Atlanta-based real estate development company. He is launching the series in commemoration of his parents’ life-long contributions to culture and education in their community.

“I can never be as selfless and giving as my parents were and continue to be. It is just not possible. They define the word mensch!” said son, Norman Radow, whose own contributions to KSU include transforming the University by doubling its land holdings, building thousands of student housing units, the first dining hall and parking decks, as well as other facilities. He also led the effort to build KSU’s stadium and the adjacent KSU Sports and Recreation Park. The park’s main road is named “Radow Way” in his honor.

“Bagels and Grits” features Rockoff, vice president of the Southern Jewish Historical Society and former director of the History Department at the Goldring/Woldenberg Institute of Southern Jewish Life. He will discuss the dynamics of historic Judaic life in the American South.

"We are so pleased that Norman Radow has created this lecture series in honor of his parents,” said Catherine Lewis, professor of history at KSU and executive director of Museums, Archives & Rare Books. “He has given so much to KSU, and we believe the Paul and Beverly Radow Lecture Series on Jewish Life supports KSU's mission and commitment to diversity."

About Paul and Beverly Radow

Brooklyn, N.Y., natives Paul and Beverly Radow have been married for more than 65 years and raised three children with an emphasis on community engagement and philanthropy. Paul was an engineer and Beverly a legal secretary. During WWII, Paul was a flight engineer on the B-25 and B-29. While serving as a director of Economic Development for New York City, he started a test program for the U.S. Department of Commerce to assist manufacturers hurt by imports. The program later became a national model. Now 90 and 85 respectively, Paul and Beverly still lead a very active lifestyle and continue to give themselves to the community following Jewish teachings that each of us are obligated to help repair the world.

For additional information about the April 24 lecture or the Paul and Beverly Radow Lecture Series on Jewish Life, please contact Anna Tucker at 770-420-4699 or atucke20@kennesaw.edu.

 

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Kennesaw State University is the third-largest university in Georgia, offering 80 graduate and undergraduate degrees, including doctorates in education, business and nursing, and a new Ph.D. in international conflict management. A member of the University System of Georgia, Kennesaw State is a comprehensive, residential institution with a growing population of 24,600 students from more than 130 countries.

 




A leader in innovative teaching and learning, Kennesaw State University offers more than 150 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degrees to its more than 35,000 students. With 13 colleges on two metro Atlanta campuses, Kennesaw State is a member of the University System of Georgia and the third-largest university in the state. The university's vibrant campus culture, diverse population, strong global ties and entrepreneurial spirit draw students from throughout the region and from 92 countries across the globe. A Carnegie-designated doctoral institution, it is one of the 50 largest public institutions in the country. For more information, visit kennesaw.edu.

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